Coherence Therapy


The art & science of lasting change




PSYCHOTHERAPY UNIFICATION
VIA MEMORY RECONSOLIDATION

Psychotherapy systems with a published case revealing the presence of the steps of process that induce memory reconsolidation and erasure (profound unlearning) of problematic emotional learnings.


This is a growing list; see explanation below.
Page last updated: 16 May 2018

 

THERAPY
PUBLICATION
AEDP pp. 130-136 in: Ecker, B., Ticic, R., & Hulley, L. (2012). Unlocking the emotional brain: Eliminating symptoms at their roots using memory reconsolidation. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Alexander Technique Ticic, R., & Kushner, E. (2015). Deep release for body and soul: Memory reconsolidation and the Alexander technique. The Neuropsychotherapist, 10, 24-28. doi:10.12744/tnpt(10)024-028
 
Coherence Therapy pp. 39-124 in: Ecker, B., Ticic, R., & Hulley, L. (2012). Unlocking the emotional brain: Eliminating symptoms at their roots using memory reconsolidation. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Emotion Focused Therapy pp. 136-141 in: Ecker, B., Ticic, R., & Hulley, L. (2012). Unlocking the emotional brain: Eliminating symptoms at their roots using memory reconsolidation. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
EMDR pp. 141-148 in: Ecker, B., Ticic, R., & Hulley, L. (2012). Unlocking the emotional brain: Eliminating symptoms at their roots using memory reconsolidation. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
IPNB pp. 148-151 in: Ecker, B., Ticic, R., & Hulley, L. (2012). Unlocking the emotional brain: Eliminating symptoms at their roots using memory reconsolidation. New York, NY: Routledge.
 
NLP Ecker, B. (2015). Using NLP for memory reconsolidation: A glimpse of integrating the panoply of psychotherapies. The Neuropsychotherapist, 10 (1), 50-56. doi:10.12744/tnpt(10)050-056
 
Progressive Counting Lasser, K. A., & Greenwald, R. (2015). Progressive counting facilitates memory reconsolidation. The Neuropsychotherapist, 10, 30-37. doi:10.12744/tnpt(10)030-037
 
Social-Cognitive Transactional Analysis
 
Ecker, B., Ticic, R., Hulley, L., & Bastianelli, L. (2018). A demonstration of Social-Cognitive Transactional Analysis implementing the Therapeutic Reconsolidation Process.
 
Tapping / Energy Psychology Feinstein, D. (2015). How energy psychology changes deep emotional learnings. The Neuropsychotherapist, 10, 38-49. doi:10.12744/tnpt(10)038-049
 


In transformational change, an unwanted state of mind, behavior, and/or somatic disturbance ceases completely and lastingly, and no effort is needed for maintaining this liberating shift.  Transformational change occurs through the profound unlearning and nullification of the acquired, problematic pattern, which happens through the memory reconsolidation (MR) process.

Numerous laboratory studies have established that the brain requires a certain set of experiences for MR to be induced and for a target learning to be erased through profound unlearning.  As carried out in psychotherapy, the required set of experiences is known as the therapeutic reconsolidation process or TRP. (For details, see readings listed at right.)

Many systems of psychotherapy carry out the TRP to bring about transformational change, even though the conceptual frameworks of most therapy systems make no explicit reference to MR or its requirements (with the exception of Coherence Therapy, which follows the process closely and explicitly).

Whenever transformational change occurs in any form of therapy (or outside of therapy), the necessary set of experiences must have occurred, whether or not the therapist or counselor was aware of them or has any knowledge of MR or the TRP.

The list above identifies therapy systems that have at least one published case example showing in detail how the TRP is implemented by the system's methodology.

Many other systems of therapy also fulfill the TRP and produce transformational change, but a fine-grain account has not yet been mapped out and presented.  This list will grow as more such mappings are published.  In this way, we are establishing the TRP as a framework of psychotherapy unification and integration that gives practitioners of different systems a shared map and vocabulary of therapeutic action.

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Readings on
Memory Reconsolidation

 

Chapter 2 in Unlocking the Emotional Brain explains reconsolidation research findings, how reconsolidation works, and how this knowledge translates into a process that psychotherapists can guide for dispelling a wide range of symptoms at their emotional and neural roots. The rest of the book provides many case examples.

 

"A Primer on Memory Reconsolidation and Its Psychotherapeutic Use as a Core Process of Profound Change" is an article adapted from the book, Unlocking the Emotional Brain, and published in The Neuropsychotherapist.

 

For a short, introductory version of these concepts and research findings, see the January 2011 blog article, Reconsolidation:
A Universal, Integrative Framework for Highly Effective Psychotherapy
.

 

For a more rigorous, lengthy account of these concepts and research findings, see the peer-reviewed journal article, Memory Reconsolidation Understood and Misunderstood in the International Journal of Neuropsychotherapy.

 

The neural mechanisms that may correspond to Coherence Therapy’s process of change are described in detail in a series of three articles in the Journal of Constructivist Psychology:

 

Download three abstracts»
Download article 1»

Download article 2»

Download article 3»

 

Easy-reading articles in the Psychotherapy Networker on memory reconsolidation and how it is brought about in Coherence Therapy:

 

Unlocking the Emotional Brain: Is Memory Reconsolidation the Key to Transformation? »

 

The Brain's Rules for Change»

 

How a brain imaging study could help reveal the role of reconsolidation in Coherence Therapy: Download»

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